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Project Description

Frankenweek: a ten-day festival marking the bicentenary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, in partnership with the global Frankenreads project (frankenreads.org). Frankenweek@UL comprised a number of interdisciplinary and collaborative endeavours, including, among other things, an undergraduate poster competition; a half-day symposium; a screening of Mel Brooks’ YoungFrankenstein (1974);  a demonstration of the science behind Shelley’s novel with Peter Davern (Chemical Sciences, UL); a reading and Q&A with Cork author Danny Denton in conjunction with One Campus, One Book; a writing workshop for teens with UL writer-in-residence Martin Dyar and Narrative4; an Ogham Stone writing competition; a public reading of selections from Frankenstein; and lectures by Prof. Graham Allen (UCC), Dr. Susan Manly (St. Andrews),  Prof. Tom Moylan (UL), Prof. Billy O’Connor (GEMS), Cethan Leahy (novelist and editor of The Penny Dreadful), and Dr. Emily Mark-Fitzgerald (UCD).

Principal Investigators

Drs. Christina Morin and Carrie Griffin

Grant Sources

AHSS Teaching and Learning Board; AHSS Research Grant; funding from the School of English, Irish, and Communication, the Centre for Early Modern Studies, the Arts Office at UL, and IED.

Dates

22-31 October 2018

 

 

Project Description

This study entitled ‘Exploring Gender Identity and Gender Norms in Primary Schools’ sought to understand how gender identities and gender norms are understood, experienced and negotiated in primary schools by: (a) transgender and gender variant children and their families (b) primary school educators. Eleven parents of transgender and gender variant children aged between 5 and 12 and seven primary school educators took part in this study. Key findings are as follows: 1. The children in this study were strongly gender non-conforming from the time they could communicate. 2. Across the children in this study, there was a diversity of approaches to negotiating their gender identity and using names and pronouns. 3. The parents and their children in this study experienced significant pressures related to the gender identity binary in society. 4. In attempting to support their child, parents were in a vulnerable position, particularly because of the age of their child. 5. Parents’ everyday negotiations with schools and health services were affected by their economic, social, cultural and symbolic resources. 6. Highly gendered systems, practices and language in primary schools caused particular difficulties for the children in this study. 7. Educators lacked knowledge about gender identity diversity and the onus was often on the parents to support, educate and procure resources. 8. An absence of national education directives — exacerbated by confusion and fear about the age of children, religious affiliation and religious ethos — caused reluctance and inaction among educators. 9. The approach to gender identity in schools was largely reactive and focused on supporting an individual transgender child, often constraining broader learning and change related to gender. For more detail, the report is available here: https://ulir.ul.ie/handle/10344/6889

Principal Investigator

Aoife Neary PhD

Co-Investigator

Catherine Cross  

External Partner

Transgender Equality Network of Ireland  

grant Source

Irish Research Council: New Foundations Engaging Civic Society Strand

Dates

2017-2018

 

Project Description

Researched linkages between the economic empowerment of women and international law: four reports produced addressing four areas; 1. Scoping; 2. i. Equal Remuneration; ii. Equal Access to Economic Activity; 3. i. Women in Power and Decision-Making; ii. Gender Responsive Budgeting; 4. The Collective Approach. Country specific examples were researched (each time, for all subjects), and empirical evidence sought and compared with claims made as well as obligations undertaken.  A major benefit is that the membership of the Committee is drawn from a wide range of jurisdictions (legal and economic).

Principal Investigators; Co-Investigators

Members of ILA International Committee on Feminism and International Law - see (http://www.ila-hq.org - Committees) (2011-2018) for full list of members and alternates - drawn from several countries reflecting the membership of the International Law Association (ILA). 

Chair - Patricia Conlan;

Rapporteurs: Judy Walsh, (UCD) and Denise Roche, (NWCI) - different periods.

Dates

2011-2018

Project Outputs

Reports 1 (Sofia Seventy-Fifth Conference 2012); 2 (Washington Seventy-Sixth Conference 2014) and 3. (Johannesburg Seventy-Seventh Conference 2016) have been published and no. 4 (Sydney Seventy-Eighth Conference 2018) is due this year: the publisher is The International Law Association, London.

 

Project Description

This study entitled ‘Exploring Homophobia and Transphobia in Primary Schools’ sought to open up a conversation about the current shape of Irish primary schools with regard to gender and sexuality identity, beginning with the perspectives and experiences of school leaders, teachers and parents. Six schools and a total of 46 people took part. This included six school leaders, twelve teachers and 28 parents The key findings are as follows: 1. Addressing homophobia/transphobia and educating around gender and sexuality identity happened in an ad hoc and mostly reactive manner. 2. School leaders and teachers were central in schools’ approaches. 3. Dialogue unravelled ‘childhood innocence’ and yielded the potential for an incremental, holistic education about gender and sexuality identity. 4. Assumptions and uncertainties about religious ethos reproduced silences and posed challenges across all school types. 5. Accounts from several schools revealed norms and practices that did not cater for all children equally. For more detail, the report is available here: https://ulir.ul.ie/handle/10344/5874

Principal Investigator

Aoife Neary PhD

Co-Investigators

Sandra Irwin-Gowran; Eileen McEvoy 

External Partner

Gay and Lesbian Equality Network of Ireland

Grant Source

Irish Research Council: New Foundations Engaging Civic Society Strand

Dates

2015-2016

 

Project Description

Women are under-represented at senior levels in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths (STEM) disciplines worldwide. This under-representation is receiving attention at EU and National level, on the basis that this homogeneity impedes creativity, diversity and innovation and limits attracting and retaining female students to these disciplines.

UL and six partner universities are involved in this five-year FESTA Project, whose aim is to increase the numbers of women in science and technology by implementing changes in the working environment. Within the overall project, there are seven different work packages, which include: Awareness Raising, Decision Making and Communication Processes, Perceptions of Excellence in Hiring Processes, PhD Supervision and Resistance to Equality Measures.

As a result of the project, partner institutions will have increased awareness of:

  • Structural factors that have different impacts on women and men
  • Gender bias in research appraisal and
  • The problems caused by resistance in implementing gender equality measures

Principal Investigators

Prof Pat O’Connor and Prof Ita Richardson

Co-Investigator

Prof Edmond Magner, Dean, Science and Engineering

Project Manager

Dr Clare O’Hagan, Research Fellow FESTA

External Partners

Uppsala University, Sweden; Syddanske Universitet, Denmark; FWTH Aachen Universitat, Germany; Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Italy; SWU Bulgaria; Istanbul Teknik Universitesi, Turkey.

Dates

February 2012 - January 2017

Grant Source

EU. FP7-Science-in-Society-2011-1. Project No. 287526

Grant Amount

Total funding: 729,664

EU funding: 455,812

Matched funding: 194,512

Project Description

The project’s particular focus is on HR-related practices, specifically on selection, performance management and promotions/advancement, and aims to influence private and public sector employers to improve gender balance in key decision-making positions through the design and development of a ‘Best Practice Guide to Accelerate Progress towards Gender Balance in Key Decision-Making Positions’. An additional aim is to encourage business schools to promote gender diversity in leadership positions through the design of a training programme for undergraduate, postgraduate and post-experience students on ‘Why gender balance on key decision-making committees makes good business sense’.

Principal Investigator

Dr Christine Cross

Co-Investigators

Mr Tommy Foy, Human Resources Director

Ms Marie Connolly, HR Manager

Post-doctoral Researcher: Dr Caroline Murphy

External Partners

Irish Business and Employers’ Confederation; Cranfield School of Management, UK; Dell Computers, EMEA; University of Abertay, Scotland.

Dates

October 2014 - September 2016

Grant Source

European Commission PROGRESS

Grant Amount

Total funding: 311.929,05

EU funding: 249.543,24

Matched funding: 62,385.81

Project Outputs

See http://www.gemprogress.com/

Project Description

Building on literature on Irish women’s migration this Spanish national research project focused on Irish and Galician women’s mobility and how it is represented in contemporary Irish and Galician literature.

Principal Investigator

Dr Manuela Palacios González, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela

Ireland-Based Partner

Dr Breda Gray (UL)

Collaboration

Universidade de Santiago de Compostela; Universidad de Almería; Universidade de Vigo; Universidade da Coruña, University of Limerick.

Dates

2013-2015

Grant Source

Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad Grant

Outputs

Three peer reviewed journal articles and two conference papers; one conference panel.

 

Project Description

This project is part of a cross national study of senior management in eight countries (UK, Portugal, Sweden, Turkey, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland). It is particularly concerned with locating higher education in a wider societal context as well as exploring the relevance of gender and organisational models (particularly collegiality/managerialism) in understanding the experiences of those in, what are effectively, elite positions in universities.

Thus it explores the extent of the power of senior management within these organisations, as well as the limits of that power in the context of the wider constraints of the state and the market. It looks at the pathways into these positions; at the explanations offered for the scarcity of women in them; it explores stereotypical ideas about management styles; and senior managers’ identification of the valued characteristics and competences of those in these positions in their own organisation. It looks at their experiences of being in senior management: in terms of the interactional context; in terms of the content of the job itself and its perceived advantages/disadvantages as well as their commitment to a managerial position.

Principal Investigator

Prof Pat O’Connor

Co-Investigators

The project was undertaken as part of a wider cross national study and a number of publications have emerged in collaboration with the members of that group, individually and collectively.

External Partners

Prof Barbara Bagilhole (Loughborough University); Prof Anita Goransson (Uppsala University); Prof Teresa Carvalho (CIPES and Aveiro); Dr Kate White (Ballarat, Australia)

Dates

2008-2014

Grant Source

IRCHSS, Swedish Research Council, etc.

Project Outputs

  • O'Connor, P (2014) Management and Gender in Higher Education. Manchester: MUP (distribution by Palgrave MacMillan in US)
  • O'Connor, P. and Carvalho, T. (2014) ‘Different or similar: constructions of leadership by senior managers in Irish and Portuguese universities’, Studies in Higher Education, 06/2014, 1-28 (online).
  • O’Connor, P. Carvalho, T. and White, K. (2014) ‘The Experiences of Senior Positional Leaders in Australian, Irish and Portuguese Universities: Universal or Contingent?’ Higher Education Research and Development: Special Issue on Leadership, 33 (1): 5-18 (online)
  • O'Connor, P. and Goransson, A. (2014) 'Constructing or Rejecting the Notion of Other in Senior University Management: The Cases of Ireland and Sweden', Educational Management, Administration and Leadership 1741143214523015, first published on June 17, 2014
  • O’Connor, P. (2014) ‘Understanding success: A Case Study of Gendered Change in the Professoriate’, Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management 36(2) 212-224 (online)
  • O’Connor, P. and White, K. (2012) ‘Similarities and differences in Collegiality/ Managerialism in Irish and Australian Universities’ Gender and Education 27 (3): 903-920 http://hdl.handle.net/10344/3087
  • O'Connor, P. (2012) ‘Irish Universities: Male Dominated? Limits and Possibilities for Change?’ Equality, Diversion and Inclusion: An International Journal 31 (1): 83-96
  • O'Connor, P. (2011) 'Where do women fit in university senior management? An analytical typology of cross national organisational cultures', B. Bagilhole and K. White (eds) Gender, Power and Management: A Cross Cultural Analysis of Higher Education. Palgrave Macmillan pp168-191
  • O'Connor, P. (2010) ‘Gender and Organisational Culture at Senior Management Level: Limits and Possibilities for Change?’ in J. Harford and C. Rush (eds) Women and Higher Education in Ireland 1850-2010. Have Women made a Difference? Oxford: Peter Lang pp139-162 (online)
  • O'Connor, P. (2010) ‘Is Senior Management in Irish Universities male dominated? What are the implications?’ Irish Journal of Sociology 18 (1): 1-21 (online)

Project Description

As my co-editor and I establish in our introduction, the female body, with its history as an object of social control, expectation, and manipulation, is central to understanding the gendered construction of shame. Through the study of 20th-century literary texts, this volume demonstrates how shame structures women’s relationships and shapes women’s identities. In examining works by women authors from around the world, it provides an interdisciplinary and transnational perspective on female shame.

Principal Investigator

Patricia Moran

External Partners

Erica L. Johnson Associate Professor of English, Wagner College, New York.

Dates

2011-2013

Publications related to the project

The Female Face of Shame (Indiana University Press, 2013) (includes co-authored introduction and one chapter)

Project Description

This project investigated the role of the Catholic Church in the social protection of migrants (emigrants from Ireland and immigrants to Ireland) from the mid-20th century to the present. The project has since developed to a wider project addressing the relative roles of church and state in the social protection of migrants.  This research locates the Irish case study in the wider field of research on Transnational Social Protection globally.  As origin-state diaspora engagement policies proliferate, the project is investigating the intersections between church and state in protecting non-resident citizens.

Principal Investigator

Breda Gray

Research Team

Breda Gray

Ria O’Sullivan Lago

Natalia Mazurkiewicz

Dr Eoin O’Mahony (DCU) acted in an advisory role

Funding Source

Irish Research Council

Dates

2009-2013

Outputs to Date

2019-2021: Writing up research monograph.

IdEx University of Bordeaux Initiative of Excellence, Visiting Scholar Award at Centre Émile Durkheim. Sciences Po Bordeaux, Sept-Dec 2019.

Visiting Scholar, Department of Sociology, Wellesley College and at the Transnational Studies Initiative (TSI) at Harvard University, Fall 2018.

6 peer reviewed journal articles

6 book chapters

4 Workshops International on Religion in the Public Sphere (UL)

Database of 70 interviews with migrant chaplains, directors of pro-migrant NGOs, and Philanthropic funders

Database 84 documents (church and state on migration, integration and state diaspora engagement policy)

Archive of 28 interviews (with consent) migrant chaplains and supporting materials UL Glucksman Library, Institutional Repository

Special edited edition of Irish Journal of Sociology – developing transnational methodological and substantive insights from project.

16 conference papers

Collaborations: Wellesley College and Transnational Studies Initiative Harvard; Centre Émile Durkheim, Sciences Po Bordeaux

Project Description

My colleague Prof Catherine Paul and I are preparing the first fully corrected and annotated scholarly edition of the occult philosophical book A Vision by W. B. Yeats. The book Yeats sometimes felt was his most important work, A Vision was written (and published, in a limited edition) between 1917 and 1925, then rewritten in the last decade of the poet’s life and published again in 1937. It is a strange and difficult work that illuminates many of his most famous and most powerful poems and plays. It is also an unusually collaborative work in that it had its genesis in mediumistic experiments in automatic writing, which Yeats undertook with his wife George Hyde Lees.

Our edition, part of the Collected Works of W. B. Yeats (Scribner), will bring an important text to new light, showing the Yeatses’ creative research into areas as diverse as Neoplatonism, Indian philosophy, Theosophy, spiritualism, Asian art, Idealist philosophy, anthropology, Italian philosophical and political thought, and modern theatre, in addition to world literature.

Principal Investigator

Prof. Margaret Mills Harper (UL)

Co-Investigators

Prof Catherine Paul

External Partners

Clemson University (South Carolina, USA)

Dates

2008-2013

Project Outputs

Publications related to the project: A Vision (1937)

Other related outputs/outcomes: Articles and conference papers derived from the primary research, an MA thesis and a PhD dissertation by students who are helping on the project.

Project Description

The Nomadic Work/Life in the Knowledge Economy project is a joint project between the Departments of Sociology and Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS) at UL.

As the Irish economy is further integrated in the global knowledge economy, this project is investigating new forms of work and professional practice in high-tech, academic research and creative industries. As the knowledge economy is marked by intense flows of capital, goods, people and ideas, mobility becomes a critical feature of contemporary life for individuals, organisations and nations, not only internationally but also at personal, local and regional levels.

This project is investigating the challenges and opportunities posed by knowledge/professional mobility, as the country seeks to reposition itself in a ‘post Celtic Tiger’ phase and specifically addresses the question of how mobile work affects work and non-work activities and the gendered implications across the ICT, new creative and academic areas of work.

Principal Investigators

Dr Breda Gray (Sociology)

Dr Luigina Ciolfi, Interaction Design Centre, CSIS)

Co-Investigators

Dr Anthony D’Andrea (2008-2010)

Fabiano Pinatti de Carvalho (PhD Scholar)

Lisa Wixted (PhD Scholar)

External Partners

Dr Michaela Benson (Keele University), Dr Elaine Moriarty (Trinity College Dublin), Dr Misha Myers (University of Falmouth), Dr Justin Spinny (University of Surrey), and Dr. Jo Vergunst (University of Aberdeen), Prof. Tim Cresswell (University of London); Dr Detleve Lück (Mainz University Germany); Dr Henrike Rau (NUI Galway); Dr Carsten Sorensen (LSE); Prof. John Urry (CeMoRe, Lancaster University); Prof. Rosalind Gill (King’s College London), Dr Kate Kenny (National University Ireland – Galway); Dr Kate Boyer (University of Southampton); Prof. Dianne Perrons (LSE); Dr Doris Ruth Eikhof, (University of Stirling); Dr Katie Milestone (Manchester Metropolitan University), Prof. Gloria Mark (University of California, Irvine); Dr Mark Perry (Brunel University); Professor Barbara Czarniawska (University of Gothenburg, Sweden).

Dates

2008-2012

Grant Source

PRTLI4 (Irish Social Science Platform)

Grant Amount

€500,000+

Project Outputs

  • 3 data sets: ICT entrepreneurs /high-skilled workers (archived Institutional Repository Glucksman Library at UL); online creative entrepreneurs; and academics (all in the greater Limerick area)
  • 4 NWL International Seminars:
  • 1st NWL International Seminar: Mobility and Nomadicity Methodologies
  • 2nd NWL International Seminar: Methodologies for Mobilities Research
  • 3rd NWL International Seminar Series: Mobility, Technology, Gender and Work
  • 4th NWL International Seminar Series – Seminar II: ‘Work Around - Practices around Technology, Space and the Ever-changing Nature of Organisational Life’
  • Special issue of the journal Mobilities 6(2) Spring 2011
  • Further 2 special edited journals forthcoming
  • 12 international conference papers
  • Knowledge exchange activities completed with National Technology Park, IxDA Limerick
  • Book proposal for a jointly written monograph underway

Project Description

This research investigates the public concern regarding the need for role models for young men arising out of recent scholarship about boys and academic underachievement. It critically examines from the perspective of parents, teachers, and students, mentorship needs and models.

Principal Investigators

Dr Kevin Davison, School of Education, NUI Galway

Dr Orla McCormack, School of Education, University of Limerick

Dates

February 2011 – September 2012

Project Outputs

Peer-reviewed research papers.

 

Project Description

Conceptions of national identity are gendered in Ireland, as in other national contexts, and to define oneself as a patriot was to be gendered in a particular way. In Ireland, to engage with national politics and national conflicts in the period between the Land War and Partition was to find oneself grappling with gendered norms and expectations, through which distinctive modes of ‘patriotic action’ could be validated or naturalised, but also re-interpreted or condemned. At the same time, in an international context, imperial and colonial conflicts of the late nineteenth-century opened up new conceptions of space and national identity, while in the early twentieth century, the First World War produced a sustained literary re-evaluation of cultures of militarisms and masculinity. These political events were, however, taking place alongside a series of other conflicts, conflicts centred around disruptions of norms of gendered behaviour and class alignments, as well as disruptions of literary norms with the rise of Modernism. The aim of this research project is to interrogate the literary tropes and political constructions through which women’s writing conceptualises conflict, and the processes through which narratives of identity – gender, national, local, literary – are constructed, de-constructed and rewritten as counter-narratives.

Principal Investigator

Prof. Margaret Mills Harper (UL)

Dr Tina O’Toole (UL)

Dr Muireann Ó Cinnéide (NUIG)

Dr Gillian McIntosh (QUB)

External Partners

Prof. Patricia Coughlan (UCC)

Dr Clíona Ó Gallchóir (UCC)

Dr Maureen O’Connor (UCC)

Dr Eamonn Hughes (Queen’s University Belfast)

Dr Gillian McIntosh (Queen’s University Belfast)

Prof Heidi Hansson (Umeå University, Sweden)

Prof Hedwig Schwall (KU Leuven, Belgium)

Dr Elke D’hoker (KU Leuven, Belgium)

Dr Kathryn Laing (Mary Immaculate College Limerick)

Dr Maura Cronin (Mary Immaculate College Limerick)

Dates

Project start: April 20th 2011

Project Outputs

April 2011: European Working Group meeting held at UL; this brought the majority of our group together to initiate the research project and to plan research outcomes and future funding bids.

2011-13: Individual research leading to finished articles in the fields of literary history, literary criticism, late-imperial and colonial politics, cultural analysis, and psychoanalytic literary criticism.

2012-13: Two-day international symposium, to involve members of our group planned for June 2012, titled: ‘Behind the Lines: Women, War and Letters 1880-1920’. Professor Matthew Campbell (York) will be one of the plenary speakers at this event.

2016: Women Writing War: Ireland 1880-1922, eds. Tina O’Toole, Gillian McIntosh, Muireann O’Cinneide (UCD Press, 2016)

Project Description

This IRCHSS Graduate Research Education Programme was a structured PhD offered jointly with UCD. There are students based in UL and in UCD working on the theme of gender, culture and identity. Twelve PhD students enrolled.

Principal Investigators

Professor Gerardine Meaney, GREP Director

Dr Bernadette Whelan, UL Course Director

Co-Investigator

Professor Mary O’Dowd, School of History, QUB

External Partners

Queen’s University Belfast

Trinity College Dublin

University of Warwick

University College London

Dates

2007-2012

Grant Source

Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Grant Amount

€991,020

Project Outputs

2 International and 1 national conference, 2 symposia, 4 workshops, 1 summer school, one follow up workshop and network, 2 exhibition catalogues.

New Voices and Counter-Narratives: Hannah Lynch, Transnational Literary and Publishing Networks, and Late-Nineteenth-Century Irish Women's Writing

Project Description

The aim of this project is to uncover dissonant voices, alternative perspectives, new narratives of transnational literary connections and publishing networks in the Irish fin de siècle. The life and writing of Dublin-born but Paris-based writer, Hannah Lynch (1859-1904) in the contexts of the dominant debates of the period: nationalism, imperialism, women and education, the Irish Literary Revival, Decadence, and the New Woman, provides an ideal lens for this study. Lynch’s ‘Europeanized perspective’, evident in all of her work, offers a broader picture of life and writing in Ireland at the fin de siècle than ‘the Irish grand narrative’ has allowed, in particular the grand narrative of the Irish Literary Revival. While her literary career intersected with some of the major Irish writers of the period, such as W.B. Yeats, Oscar Wilde and George Moore, her work also opened up dialogues with a diversity of English and European writers. She was published alongside Joseph Conrad in Blackwood's magazine and she frequented literary salons attended by Walter Pater, Henry James and Marcel Proust. Her cosmopolitan and feminist connections established in London and Paris through the English writers Mabel and Mary Robinson and the French historian and biographer, Cécile Vincens (Arvède Barine), for example, shaped her writing, specifically in relation to the discourses of gender and national identity. Through new and original archival excavation and critical analysis of hitherto unstudied texts, the aim is to recover a distinctly different narrative of Ireland and late-nineteenth-century writing, revealing fresh avenues of critical enquiry into late-nineteenth-century Irish women’s writing and its European contexts. Exposing hidden female networks and connections, neglected literary and critical voices, narratives and counter-narratives, will be a major outcome of the project and base for further research. It will also inform the overall shape and substance of the study.

Principal Investigator

Dr Kathryn Laing (MIC, University of Limerick)

Co-Investigators

Dr Faith Binckes (Worcester College, University of Oxford)

External Partners

University of Oxford

Dates

2007- 2019

Grant Source

MIC Seed Funding

Grant Amount

€4,177.39

Project Outputs

Publications related to the project:

Laing, K. & F. Binckes, (2012). 'Irish Autobiographical Fiction: Hannah Lynch’s Autobiography of a Child'. English Literature in Transition Vol 55, 2, 195-218.*

Laing, K. & F. Binckes, (2011) 'An Irishwoman in Belle Epoque Paris: Literary networks, cultural debate and the writing of Hannah Lynch. Etudes Irlandaises No. 36-2, 157-171.

Laing, K. & F. Binckes, (2010). 'From “Wild Irish Girl” to “Parisianised Foreigner”: Hannah Lynch and France' in War of the Words: Literary Rebellion in France and Ireland. Publication du CRBC Rennes-2, TIR, 41-58.

Laing, K. & F. Binckes, (2010). ‘A Vagabond’s Scrutiny: Hannah Lynch in Europe’. In: Elke d’Hoker, Raphaël Ingelbien and Hedwig Schwall (Eds) Irish Women Writers: Irish and European Contexts. Peter Lang.

Other related outputs/outcomes:

Monograph on Hannah Lynch

‘Inventing and Re-Inventing the Irish Woman’: External Influences on Gender Construction, 1760-2005

Project Details

This IRCHSS Thematic Project ‘Inventing and Re-Inventing the Irish Woman’: External Influences on Gender Construction, 1760-2005, finished in 2010/11.

Principal Investigators

Dr Bernadette Whelan, Department of History UL

Professor Gerardine Meaney, Director, Humanities Institute of Ireland, UCD

Co-Investigator:

Professor Mary O’Dowd, School of History, QUB

External Partners

Queen’s University Belfast

Trinity College Dublin

University of Warwick

University College London

Dates

2006-2010

Grant Source

Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Grant Amount

€150,000

Project Outputs

The principal results of the research are new datasets generated through the project, including a) subscriber lists to selected eighteenth-century Irish publications; b) excerpts from the oral history interviews on the theme of American influences on Irish women; c) a digital archive of the exhibition history of films and reviews in Irish publications of work by women writers and filmmakers from outside Ireland; d) lists of books acquired by one library which is indicative of the type of reading selected both for readers by library committees and favoured by readers in 1930s Ireland with nationality and gender of authors identified where possible; e) a list of 'Women Playwrights at the Gate Theatre, Dublin'; f) a listing of poetry by women from outside Ireland; and g) a list of films directed or written by women shown at the Irish Film Institute. Other publications produced by the project include articles, chapters, conference papers, an edited collection and an interdisciplinary, collaborative volume.